Friday, July 8, 2011

Unfair Taxation.


The effect of the Double Taxation Convention France/UK
The example below illustrates the gross unfairness of the imposition of the Double Taxation Convention on many British expatriates in France.
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Mr. and Mrs Smith are OAPs resident in France.
Let us suppose that they jointly have a global income of 32000 euros, all of it originating from the UK.
It originates from two sources. A Government service pension, and the joint Old Age Pensions (full for Mr. Smith, and Mrs. Smith has a reduced pension as a wife on her husband’s contributions).
The Government pension is £17715/year and the joint OAPs are £10125/year.
In Euros this is 20362 € and 11638€ respectively
These together are £27840 which at 1€= £0.87 is 32000 euros

The £17715 is taxable in the UK. Tax claimed is £820
The 11638 euros of OAP are taxable in France. Tax claimed on this is zero.
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A home help is employed which costs 2000 euros/year (less than three hours/week). This, in France, attracts a 50% tax abatement of 1000 euros.
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If the whole 32000€ were taxable in France, then only 354€ (£307) tax would be payable.
As it is Mr. Smith is taxed £820 in the UK.
It is patently clear that the DTC is discriminatory against Mr. Smith.
It is clear that Mr. Smith pays more tax than a French National in exactly the same circumstances.
It is clear that Article 25 of the Double Taxation Treaty is infringed.
Article 25 states that no-one should suffer a greater tax load compared with a French National as a result of the operation of the Double Taxation Convention.
Article 26 requires that the HMRC should take action if article 25 is infringed.  They refuse to do so!